The Road to Renovation Redux

Surprise!

You’ve bought an older home and now you’re ready to renovate. You know who your architect is. You know who your contractor is. You even know what you want to do.

What you don’t know is that underneath the linoleum in the laundry room is 3/4” plywood.

Sitting on top of 2X6 floor joists.

Resting on Astroturf.

Laid over brick pavers.

Sitting on top of the original concrete garage slab.

Surprise!

We always tell a client prior to starting a renovation to expect at least one surprise. No matter how new the house or how many prior renovations, there is always a hidden condition about which no one would have guessed. Sometimes it is good (mahogany paneling behind drywall) and sometimes not so good (“Why yes! Those are active termites in your master closet!”)

James and I didn’t get too far into our renovation before we had our first surprise – the framer looking at the vaulted living room ceiling and telling the contractor, “This will never pass inspection.” Fifty years of wear and tear had left the framing of the ceiling sagging and in some cases broken. While we had thought the framer might be able to patch up what was there, the reality was that the entire ceiling, including the ridge beam, needed to be reframed.

Surprise!

Beam Surprise
Our pretty new ridge beam and roof framing

The second came after the new roof had been put on and we couldn’t help but notice a slight sag over the garage we’d never seen before. Some examination found that during the roof replacement, a knot had popped out of the ridge beam, allowing the beam to flex. Again, a little extra framing and problem solved.

Still, surprise! Or as the contractor would call that – a “change order.”

We’ve actually been very lucky that our home, although 50 years old, was built well. Someone even commented to me that we should have been happy the house had insulation all of those years.

However, we don’t always get to share that experience with clients. Sometimes once the renovation process starts, you find out just how much really needs to be fixed, even when you’ve tried your hardest to discover issues before the first hammer swings.

As for the laundry room example above? Yes, that did happen on a project.

And no, we didn’t leave that as a surprise for the next owner to find.

The Road To Renovation Redux

An Open Concept Home

If you spend a little time watching HGTV or reading real estate listings, you’ll hear and see it again. Open concept. Open Concept. OPEN CONCEPT!

So much so that someone told me about a HGTV drinking game where you took a drink every time they mentioned hardwood floors, stainless steel appliances, granite countertops or open concept. While I cannot personally vouch for the effectiveness of this, I would think that’s a pretty easy way to get hammered on a Saturday or Sunday morning. And perhaps not the best way to start the day!

After two weeks of demolition work, James and I had what would have to be the ultimate in open concept (everyone take a drink!).

IMG_1619
What you might call very open concept.

Walking in the front door, we were treated to a view from one side of the house to the other and front to back with only studs in the way. While we were expecting that, in some ways we were unnerved. Until that moment, we weren’t 100% certain what the house was made of (really old 2X4s and some nasty rock wool insulation), or just how well the house was built.

Standing there staring at what would become the “new” space made me think about what architects, interior designers, clients and realtors really mean when we say “open concept,” if for no other reason we’re hearing that more and more. Clients are asking for open concept living, even if that may not suit how they use the house on a daily basis.

How much of this open concept trend is being driven by sources like HGTV? I’m not sure. However, I was having a discussion with a realtor in a networking group and posed the question to him: How much is this being driven by the realtors? Are they perpetuating the trend? Or is this just a reaction to seller/buyer requests? All I got was a sheepish grin, like a little kid caught telling stories.

I wish I had answers to all of this (or that the realtor did). Or to when the trend might come to an end. Maybe I just need to watch a little HGTV.

In the meantime, James and I are eagerly awaiting the day (soon from what I hear) that we’re not looking at just studs and insulation. And the day we may enjoy our “open concept” space.